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AVAILABLE WORK

Please contact the artist at bradley@bradleyhendershot.com for pricing.


All paintings shown below are original works of art, ©2020 Bradley Hendershot.
Sizes listed are image sizes. All works are framed and matted in neutral colors.

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Check back frequently as this page is updated as new work becomes available.



AERIAL
Watercolour, 15-1/2 x 29-1/4 inches

This group of buildings is based on the Martin Schenkel property in Oley Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania. The buildings, set well back from the road, are located just off of Memorial Highway (Pennsylvania Route 662) about a mile-and-a-half south of the town of Oley and just north of the quarry and the Oley Valley Mennonite Church. The house was built in 1766.

Since 1983, the entirety of Oley Township has been listed in the National Register of Historic Places due to its nature as a well-preserved representation of the historic rural landscape.

The painting takes its name from the television antenna next to the right-hand chimney on the house and just visible through the tree branches. This and the smoke emanating from the other chimney are the sole signs of life on this crisp Winter day. The remainder of the farm buildings are battened down for the season as the farm cart in the wagon shed awaits the arrival of Spring.




WHITE BELL
Watercolour, 17-1/2 x 29-1/4 inches

Located not far from my house and studio in Hoppenville is a wonderful grouping of farm buildings. The emphasis here is the white farm bell standing out in contrast to the darker browns, grays, and blues of the stone farmhouse. The farm is located near the intersection of Mill Hill Road and Warner School Road in Upper Hanover Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.




ROLLING ROCK
Watercolour, 15-1/2 x 29-1/4 inches




WINTER SOLITUDE
Watercolour, 15-1/2 x 29-1/4 inches

Based on a farm on Mine Lane, Oley Township, Pennsylvania.




WINTER AT THE CHAD HOUSE
Watercolour, 14 x 14 inches

This charming stone building, c.1726, was the home of John Chad--ferryman, farmer, and tavern-keeper for whom Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, was named. Now restored, it is located along Creek Road (old Route 100) in Chester County's Brandywine River Valley.




BRONZE BELL, MONHEGAN
Watercolour, 10 x 14-1/2 inches

Lightkeeper's House and bell on Monhegan Island, Maine. I am drawn again and again to painting the angular red rooflines of the lighthouse structures. The bronze bell, previously used as a fog signal at the Coast Guard Station on nearby Manana Island, was airlifted to Monhegan in 1972. The keeper's house stands 160 feet above the open Atlantic Ocean, seen to the left in the painting.




study for HUDSON HOUSE, I
Watercolour, 10 x 14-1/2 inches

Looking south from Fish Beach on Monhegan Island, Maine, one can see the impressive Elmer Hudson House. Hudson was a noted artist, and was professionally known as "Eric". The house was built in 1898.




study for SUNDIAL, I: 3:30pm
Watercolour, 10-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

Mid-day light finds much of the lightkeeper's house on Lighthouse Hill on Monhegan Island in shadow. I find endless satisfaction in painting the varied angular red rooflines of the lighthouse structures. The title of the painting, SUNDIAL, refers to the fact that anyone spending considerable time around the lightkeeper's buildings can tell the time of day fairly precisely based on the date and the angle of the shadows on the buildings.




study for ISLAND FISH HOUSES IN WINTER, I
Watercolour, 9-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

The fish house studies were done on Monhegan Island, Maine in preparation for a future larger painting. Although not an exact replication of the actual landscape, the buildings are fairly accurately rendered. I altered the scene and the relative arrangement in order to get the "feel" of a remote fishing and lobstering island twelve miles out to sea.




SKIFF ON THE ROCKS
Watercolour, 9 x 14-1/4 inches

Monhegan Island, Maine.




study for ISLAND FISH HOUSES, VII
Watercolour, 9 x 14-1/4 inches

The fish house studies were done on Monhegan Island, Maine in preparation for a future larger painting. Although not an exact replication of the actual landscape, the buildings are fairly accurately rendered. I altered the scene and the relative arrangement in order to get the "feel" of a remote fishing and lobstering island twelve miles out to sea.




study for SOUTH COAST, I
Watercolour, 9-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

This painting was done on Monhegan Island, Maine in preparation for a future larger painting. Rather than paint an exact replication of the actual landscape, the area seen to the south of Fish Beach has been altered and the building have been rearranged in order to get the "feel" of a remote fishing and lobstering island twelve miles out to sea.




FLAG DAY AT UNCLE HENRY'S, MONHEGAN
Watercolour, 9-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

John Sterling's Cistern House, also known as Uncle Henry's, was built on Monhegan Island around 1815. Originally known as the Cistern House, as it protected a water supply, it became known as Uncle Henry's in the 1930s when Henry Shaw used it as a place from which to sell his fresh produce and milk, which he brought to the Island once or twice a week. In this painting, the open door lets in the gentle sea breeze as the flag waves in the wind and seagulls ride the air currents. The empty chair on the porch makes one wonder what it would be like to while away a summer afternoon in such a location.




study for ISLAND FISH HOUSES, V
Watercolour, 8-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

The fish house studies were done on Monhegan Island, Maine in preparation for a future larger painting. Although not an exact replication of the actual landscape, the buildings are fairly accurately rendered. I altered the scene and the relative arrangement in order to get the "feel" of a remote fishing and lobstering island twelve miles out to sea.



KENT HOUSE, MONHEGAN
Watercolour, 9-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

One of my favorite locations on Monhegan Island is the area around Lobster Cove and Lobster Point, at the southern end of the Island. I often make a point of walking to this area to watch the surf pounding the rocks. The painting is of Jamie Wyeth's house, known as the Kent House, on Lobster Cove. The house was built in 1908 by artist Rockwell Kent for his mother, Sarah. I love the feeling of the house sitting on the rocks in bold defiance of the force of the sea.




study for DOCK CRANE, I
Watercolour, 9-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches






SKIFFS AND SEA ROSES AT THE VAUGHAN HOUSE, MONHEGAN
Watercolour, 10-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

The George Threfethren House, known today as the Vaughan House, as seen from Swim Beach, Monhegan Island, Maine. Built about 1822. Painted on Monhegan Island.



study for ISLAND FISH HOUSES, II
Watercolour, 8-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

The fish house studies were done on Monhegan Island, Maine in preparation for a future larger painting. Although not an exact replication of the actual landscape, the buildings are fairly accurately rendered. I altered the scene and the relative arrangement in order to get the "feel" of a remote fishing and lobstering island twelve miles out to sea.



LANE TO THE SEA
Watercolour, 9-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches






study for ISLAND FISH HOUSES, I
Watercolour, 8-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

The fish house studies were done on Monhegan Island, Maine in preparation for a future larger painting. Although not an exact replication of the actual landscape, the buildings are fairly accurately rendered. I altered the scene and the relative arrangement in order to get the "feel" of a remote fishing and lobstering island twelve miles out to sea.



study for COVE HOUSE, I
Watercolour, 9-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

One of my favorite locations on Monhegan Island is the area around Lobster Cove and Lobster Point, at the southern end of the Island. I often make a point of walking to this area to watch the surf pounding the rocks. The painting is of Jamie Wyeth's house, known as the Kent House, on Lobster Cove. The house was built in 1908 by artist Rockwell Kent for his mother, Sarah. I love the feeling of the house sitting on the rocks in bold defiance of the force of the sea.




BLUE OAR AND LOBSTER BUOY
Drybrush, 16-1/4 x 12-1/2 inches

Here's a statement that I wrote several years ago about the house depicted in this painting:

"From the first time I ever got off of a boat on Monhegan Island, I have been intrigued by the large, rambling, old house that sits atop Wharf Hill overlooking the harbor. You can see its present owner, sitting on the knoll most summer afternoons, at the top of Wharf Hill, watching the events in the harbor. Known officially as the John Sterling House, it is one of the oldest houses on Monhegan, dating to 1809. It is in disrepair--boards falling off, dark and looming. To me, it conjures up images of Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House, Nathaniel Hawthorne's House of the Seven Gables, and Stephen King's Marsten House (in 'salem's Lot). I have never been in the house--maybe it's best that I don't go in; maybe it would take all of my feelings away, when I saw that it was just an ordinary house inside instead of the haunted house I've imagined."

And now to the present:

The owner has now passed on; her descendants have restored the house, with new roof, new windows, and new clapboard siding. It's now divided into two halves, each one a rental unit. In the summer of 2008, I decided to move from my Monhegan home of a dozen years and rent the right-hand half of this house, now called the John Sterling Harbor House. This grand old house of Monhegan Island served as my summer home and studio for several years prior to opening a studio/gallery on Island with my fiancee, artist Katharine (Katy) Krieg.

Over the years, I have done a number of paintings of the front facade of this building and have once again returned to the textures of the wooden clapboards that so intrigue me. I became interested in the many textural elements in the front facade of the building, particularly the clapboard siding, which lent itself to the painstaking detail-oriented nature of drybrush. And blue - I love blue - the window shade, the oar. And then there's the red and white of the buoy and the lobster sign in the window. The grays and browns of the weathered siding are in direct contrast to the colorful blues and reds of the detail elements in the painting. My memories of the way the house used to appear prior to restoration dominate, and the restored house is in excellent shape today.

"No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream. Hill House, not sane, stood by itself against its hills, holding darkness within; it had stood for eighty years and might stand for eighty more. Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone."
Shirley Jackson The Haunting of Hill House




study for MILL HILL, I
Watercolour, 8-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

Located not far from my house and studio in Hoppenville is a wonderful grouping of farm buildings. I have started to produce small studies of the property that will eventually lead up to one or more large paintings. The farm is located near the intersection of Mill Hill Road and Warner School Road in Upper Hanover Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.




study for HILLTOP FARM, I
Watercolour, 8-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

Located not far from my house and studio in Hoppenville, I used to drive by this farm several times a week. For several years, I have kept this image of the farmhouse located up on the ridge, often silhouetted against a wonderful sky backdrop. I have started to produce small studies of the property that will eventually lead up to one or more large paintings. The farm is located on Little Road in Zieglerville, Pennsylvania.




study for AUTUMN AT HOPPENVILLE HOUSE, I
Watercolour, 8-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

Autumn is setting in at Hoppenville House in Marlborough Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. This is the house and studio that I share with my fiancee, artist Katharine (Katy) Krieg. This watercolour is the first in a series of studies leading up to a final large painting.




study for INCOMING FOG AT HOPPENVILLE HOUSE, I
Watercolour, 8-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

A fog bank rolls in at Hoppenville House in Marlborough Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. This is the house and studio that I share with my fiancee, artist Katharine (Katy) Krieg. This watercolour is the first in a series of studies leading up to a final large painting.




study for HOPPENVILLE SQUALL, I
Watercolour, 8-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

An early winter snow squall passes Hoppenville House in Marlborough Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. This is the house and studio that I share with my fiancee, artist Katharine (Katy) Krieg. This watercolour is the first in a series of studies leading up to a final large painting.




study for LIGHT IN THE LIBRARY, I
Watercolour, 9-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

Someone is catching up on some reading in the library at Hoppenville House on this late evening in early spring. This is the house and studio that I share with my fiancee, artist Katharine (Katy) Krieg. This watercolour is the first in a series of studies leading up to a final large painting.




study for KITCHEN LIGHT, I
Watercolour, 9-1/2 x 14-1/4 inches

Hoppenville House stands quiet and cozy in the snow as a light in the window suggests some late afternoon activity, hopefully supper preparations (!), taking place in the kitchen. The property is located in Marlborough Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. This is the house and studio that I share with my fiancee, artist Katharine (Katy) Krieg. This watercolour is the first in a series of studies leading up to a final large painting.




DIVIDED TOO
Watercolour, 17-1/2 x 29-1/2 inches

When I'm staying on the mainland in St. George, Maine, this is the first thing I see upon looking out my bedroom window in the morning.

I did a similar painting, more of a close-up of the house, in 2011; This one was called DIVIDED. The porch pillar cutting vertically through the American flag created the namesake for the painting DIVIDED, as that's where I saw our country at the time.

Six years later, I still see our country as divided. The second part of the painting title, "TOO", can be taken in the "also" sense, as it is still divided. Or, replace "TOO" with "TWO" and this painting becomes the second in the series of DIVIDED paintings. Notice how the right side of the flag is larger than the left side, subtly stating my political affiliation; and there is more red showing, as the blue is reduced. The open attic window symbolizes "out with the old and in with the new", a changing of politics in Washington. The flowers on the porch symbolize a re-birth, and the watering can is their nourishment. The electrical connections on the outside of the house represent all of the power in Washington. The red, white, and blue theme of the flag is repeated in the items on the porch. I've also changed the colour of the roof to red, which, along with the white of the house and the blue of the sky further emphasize my patriotism.

My friend Robert Skoglund, "The humble Farmer", who I rent from in St. George, Maine, used to own this property. He says, in an e-mail to me:

"When I was 10 I used to deliver newspapers there. I can remember going down to that dooryard in the 40s and watching Ernest polish his motorcycle. I owned it for 20 plus years. I have seen it every time I have looked out of the window for over 40 years. I have seen paintings of it by Gary Akers and Barbara Ernst Prey and Jamie (Wyeth). I had Mac Daggett put on the power entrance. I stuffed insulation in the cellar window. I had Faustini fix the chimney. I rebuilt the porch and put on the storm windows. I caught the kid who kicked out the front door. I have laughed at the chair and the flag and the flower pot on the porch as blatant, obvious props to draw in artists and chided Gary Akers for being sucked in. I have looked at this house many tens of thousands of times over the past 65 years. So what is there not to recognize unless it is the trees to the left on the northern side?" (some artistic license by me, the artist).




study for PICKUP, I
Watercolour, 10 X 14-1/2 inches

This is Quarry Farm following a recent snowfall. I've often been drawn to this interesting cluster of farm buildings on Mine Road in Oley Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania, and I've done many paintings here. In this watercolour, I've captured the old pickup truck out by one of the outbuildings. The farm is located across the road from a large limestone quarry, and the sound of the quarrying operation is a daily reminder of the encroachment of the quarry. The quarry actually owns the farm property, and the house and barns may someday be razed. The shock waves from the blasting operations must shake the house!




ISLAND CAFE
Watercolour, 21-3/4 x 29-1/4 inches

Soon after we arrived on Monhegan Island, one of its "famous" fog banks set in, blanketing the Island on and off (mostly on) for four or five days. This gave me the opportunity to work on this large watercolour of the Barnacle and the Freight Shed near the wharf. I hope that the isolation of this windswept and fogbound Island comes across in the painting. The building on the right in the painting, currently known as the Barnacle and serving as a small store and cafe;, sits on the Island wharf. It was built around 1809 as the Starling Brothers fish house, and has served as various tea rooms and gift shops in recent years.




LIGHTKEEPER'S BUNTING AND SKIFF
Watercolour, 12-1/2 x 10-3/4 inches

Monhegan Island, Maine.




BLUE SKIFF AND THE BARNACLE
Watercolour, 10-3/4 x 14-3/4 inches

This is the "Barnacle" and the wharf on Monhegan Island, Maine. The blue and red skiff adds a hint of colour to the grays and browns of Monhegan. Over the course of the summer, I did a lot of paintings that included this particular skiff. I was teased by a friend that it must've been a difficult job hauling that skiff all over the Island just to put it in a painting! In reality, the skiff remains tied up on Fish Beach.




BAIT BARREL
Drybrush, 18-1/2 x 29-1/4 inches

This scene is based on one of the outbuildings on Presqui'le Farm on Quarter Cove, Wye East River, Talbot County, on the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay. I'm fascinated by the aging blue paint on the door and on the bait barrel. A crab basket sits ready by the stoop, while a single oar balances precariously as it holds the top section of the Dutch door from blowing closed. A horseshoe is hung above the door to assure good luck for the waterman. This painting was done in the studio and is a composite of many different images. I became very involved with the textures of the various surfaces depicted in the painting - wood, brick, concrete, and burlap. The capture of these textures was perfect for instituting the painstaking process of drybrush, using very little water with the pigment and many small strokes of the brush to build up layers that describe the detail.




ISLAND RENTAL
Drybrush, 17 x 28-1/2 inches

Here's a statement that I wrote several years ago about the house in this painting:

"From the first time I ever got off of a boat on Monhegan Island, I have been intrigued by the large, rambling, old house that sits atop Wharf Hill overlooking the harbor. You can see it's present owner, sitting on the knoll most summer afternoons, at the top of Wharf Hill, watching the events in the harbor. Known officially as the John Sterling House, it is one of the oldest houses on Monhegan, dating to 1809. It is in disrepair -- boards falling off, dark and looming. To me, it conjures up images of Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House, Nathaniel Hawthorne's House of the Seven Gables, and Stephen King's Marsten House (in 'salem's Lot). I have never been in the house - maybe it's best that I don't go in; maybe it would take all of my feelings away, when I saw that it was just an ordinary house inside instead of the haunted house I've imagined."

Well, in the summer of 2006, I went into the house, as the owner, then in her 90's, had moved off-island. The house had been fixed up, with new roof, new windows, and new clapboard siding. It's now divided into two halves, each one a rental unit. I decided to do this drybrush of the front facade as it was before repairs, and for some reason I've placed a placard above the door with my initials, "BJH", carved into it. This must've been some sort of sign, as several weeks later, I decided to move from my Monhegan home of a dozen years and rent the right-hand half of this house, now called the John Sterling Harbor House, beginning in Summer of 2008. My front door will be none other than the door over which I placed the initialed placard!

"No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream. Hill House, not sane, stood by itself against its hills, holding darkness within; it had stood for eighty years and might stand for eighty more. Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone."

Shirley Jackson
The Haunting of Hill House




MELTING OFF
Watercolour, 18-1/2 x 29-1/4 inches

The last snow of the season is slowly melting away at Quarry Farm. I've often been drawn to this interesting cluster of farm buildings on Mine Road in Oley Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania, and I've done many paintings here. The farm is located across the road from a large limestone quarry, and the sound of the quarrying operation is a daily reminder of the encroachment of the quarry. The quarry actually owns the farm property, and the house and barns may someday be razed. The shock waves from the blasting operations must shake the house!




LIGHT TOWER
Drybrush, 28-1/4 x 21-1/4 inches

This drybrush was painted on location on Monhegan Island, Maine, in August of 2005. The painting started out as a fairly loose watercolour, but I became involved with the texture of the granite blocks that make up the light tower. I believe that the granite came from the island of Vinalhaven. The forty-seven foot tall tower was built in 1850, and is the second light tower on this site, the first being built in 1824. The beacon is 178 feet above sea level, making it the second highest in the state of Maine (Seguin is two feet higher at 180 feet). The light was automated in 1959. The brick "service room" was added onto the entrance to the lighthouse in 1892. The building just behind the dory is known as the tool house.




BUCKS COUNTY
Watercolour, 26 x 47 inches

This large watercolour was inspired by a visit to the Burgess Lea farm, located along River Road north of New Hope, in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The farm, which dates back to 1689, was up for sale and currently unoccupied, and I was free to roam about the property. As I trudged through the deep snow, the buildings just spoke "Bucks County" to me. Although the initial inspiration for the painting came from the actual farm, the buildings have been selectively rearranged and altered to support a stronger artistic composition.




FOG WALK
Watercolour, 18 x 29-1/4 inches

John Sterling's Cistern House, also known as Uncle Henry's, was built on Monhegan Island around 1815. Originally known as the Cistern House, as it protected a water supply, it became known as Uncle Henry's in the 1930s when Henry Shaw used it as a place from which to sell his fresh produce and milk, which he brought to the Island once or twice a week. The painting depicts Uncle Henry's in the fog, as a woman walks down Wharf Hill on her way to greet the morning boat from the mainland. An American flag on the upper deck gently waves in the breeze.



Additional works may be currently available. Please contact the artist at bradley@bradleyhendershot.com